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Thursday, January 05, 2017

Mardi Gras King Cake Recipe

I must confess. I have never baked a King Cake, but I do eat them and they are delicious.

My friend Danno at NolaCuisine.com has graciously allowed me to post his King Cake recipe here for your enjoyment. Thanks for sharing, Dan! BTW, visit his site when you get the chance. There you will find an awesome display of great New Orleans style dishes to soothe the soul.

King Cake Recipe

For the Brioche:

  • 1 envelope active dry yeast
  • 2 Tbsp warm water (115 degree F)
  • 1 tsp iodized salt
  • 2 Tbsp granulated sugar
  • 1/4 cup milk
  • 2 tsp orange zest, minced
  • 2 cups all-purpose flour, sifted
  • 1 tsp cinnamon
  • 2 eggs, beaten
  • 1 1/4 sticks cold unsalted butter, cut into very small dice
  • 1 egg beaten and 2 Tbsp water, for the egg wash
  • 1 plastic baby trinket

Dissolve the yeast in the work bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the dough hook attachment, let stand until frothy. Dissolve the salt, sugar, orange zest and milk in a small bowl. When dissolved combine the milk mixture with the yeast mixture. Mix the cinnamon with the flour.

With the mixer on low speed, add the eggs, then gradually add the flour, until all is incorporated. Knead on low speed for 10 minutes, or until a smooth elastic dough is formed. A little more flour may be necessary. With the motor running, incorporate the butter into the dough, a little at a time but rather quickly so that it doesn’t heat up and melt.

Turn the dough into an oiled bowl, loosely cover with plastic wrap and let rise for 1 hour in a warm spot. When the dough has doubled in bulk punch it down, cover and place in the refrigerator overnight.

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F.

Roll the dough out to a 6 x 18 inch rectangle. Spread the Pecan filling (recipe below) out in the middle of the rectangle along the whole length, leaving about 1 1/2 inch on each side. Place the baby trinket somewhere with the filling. Fold the length of the dough over the filling and roll up tightly, leaving the seam side down. Turn the roll into a circle, seam side down and put one end inside of the other to hide the seam, and seal the circle. Place the cake on a baking sheet and let rise, loosely covered with plastic wrap, for 45 minutes or until doubled in bulk.

Brush all over with the egg wash, then place the king cake into the oven and bake for 30 minutes or until golden brown.

When the cake cools, brush with some of the glaze (recipe below) thinned out with more cold water. This will help the sugars adhere. Decorate the cake with the colored sugars and drizzle some of the thicker glaze onto the cake.

Place on a large round serving plate and decorate with Mardi Gras beads, doubloons and whatever else that you like.

For the Pecan filling:

  • 1 cup pecan halves, broken up slightly and roasted until fragrant
  • 2/3 cup brown sugar
  • 1 tsp vanilla extract
  • 1 tsp cinnamon
  • 1/2 tsp ground allspice
  • 1 pinch of salt
  • 4 Tbsp Steen’s Cane Syrup

Combine all of the ingredients together.

For the glaze:

1/2 cup powdered sugar
1 Tbsp bourbon
water (enough to make a paste that can be drizzled)

Combine the sugar and bourbon, whisk in enough water to make a glaze that can be drizzled.

Happy Mardi Gras ! ... Ahheee!!
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4 comments:

  1. Jacques, I am like you. Never baked a King Cake but sure do like to eat them. Really hard to get a good one here.
    Poupart's Bakery in Lafayette makes about the best I have ever eaten. Francois and Louise Poupart used to come visit us each year and stay several days. They always brought lot of baked goods, and he always wanted to bake us fresh bread. When they were here last (several years ago) Louise had a stroke and passed away. Francois has not been back , he says he just does not like to travel much anymore.
    Strange that Danno and yourself are friends. I to am a friend of his. Only from his web site and facebook. I meet him through a friend, Bill Moran.
    Am I rambling or what sorry about that. Love the recipe. Bill

    ReplyDelete
  2. Small world, huh?

    My first King Cake came from Pouparts. My office was located right down the street from their bakery during my years as an oil and gas lease broker. I was a loyal customer of Francois and Louise Poupart. Did not know Louise had past, however. They were certainly the best.

    Danno at NolaCuisine.com is a great guy. If you have noticed, for years now we have had them listed on our blog as "one of our favorites".

    So, Bill, it is good to know that we share some of the same friends. Good friends at that. Take care and God bless. Thanks for the comments.

    ReplyDelete
  3. I bake a King Cake a week during the pre-lenten season. Here is a link to several different recipes, including a Mexican King Cake.
    http://mrlake.fncinc.net/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=3382

    ReplyDelete

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